The Blog

Keeping Up in the On-Demand Economy

Man Writing I Want It Now

Public transit running on delay? Request an Uber or Lyft for immediate transportation. A party gone dry? Tap a button and have alcohol rush-delivered. Forget a necessary ingredient at the grocery store? Order it through Postmates and get it in time for the next step of your recipe.

By catering to the needs of consumers in what feels like an instant, the on-demand economy has shortened consumer attention spans, rendering the need for patience in the marketplace nearly obsolete. Perhaps the most visible example is Amazon Prime Now, which offers 2-hour delivery on over 25,000 products spanning 25 product categories, from household essentials to electronics to pet supplies. The service eliminates the need to leave the room, without sacrificing immediacy or efficiency.

Traditional retailers can’t compete with the convenience and speed of immediate delivery, but that doesn’t mean there’s no room for them to succeed. Since brands likely can’t be faster or more convenient than top performers in the space, they should compete where their on-demand counterparts can’t—by creating that which can’t be replicated digitally. This is an opportunity to give consumers a compelling reason to come to them, something that offsets the “inconvenience” of in-person shopping.

Innovative grocers have taken this to heart. With delivery services like Peapod and Instacart eating into profits, they have started to expand shoppers’ expectations of what a grocery trip can entail. Rather than just purchasing food for the week ahead, consumers can now grab a drink, test out new foods and be entertained. Providing samples for customers may not be a novel approach, but Trader Joe’s makes them an integral element of the shopping experience—checkout lines frequently snake through the maze of store aisles, and shoppers know to expect a sample station along the way. Not just the chance to try something new, it’s also a way to lessen the burden of waiting in line. Whole Foods takes it a step farther, with stores now including restaurants and bars within. The bar at a Brooklyn location hosts weekly trivia nights, reflecting an attempt to create a community for shoppers.

These experiences can be complimentary or require purchase, so long as they demonstrate concern and appreciation for consumers. Cosmetics store Sephora allows shoppers to try on any product prior to purchase. Home goods retailer Sur La Table offers cooking classes that not only provide the chance to test out their cookware, but also impart new recipes and skills. The opportunity to take a product for a test drive is something that online retailers can’t provide as easily. It’s the “touch and feel” effect, and it’s lost when a purchase is made fully online.

At its heart, creating an experience is just a way to provide excellent customer service. Consumers are willing to slow down when it feels worth it, and by putting their interests at the forefront, savvy brands are able to connect with them in a meaningful way. Carving out their own niche will help traditional retailers succeed in the evolving on-demand culture, building loyalty and affinity in the landscape in which they operate.

Predicting Picks: Personalization 2.0

Personalization 2.0

From tampons to toilet paper, from streaming services to fast-casual restaurants, consumers are presented with a breadth of options so large that they can make purchase decisions based not only on what product fits their needs, but on what best aligns with their belief system. It’s a reflection of a culture that champions the individual—and the idea that there’s a specific product for every personality. Perhaps the most inherent offshoot of this idea is hyper-personalization, which is by no means a recent trend, but certainly a persistent one. From supplement regimens tailored to specific health goals to hair care products formulated from an individual’s response to a series of questions, brands are keen on serving the illusion of bespoke offerings.

But where personalization was initially presented as a feature to help consumers differentiate themselves from others, it has evolved to become more of a service—the curation of options that an individual is likely to value. It’s not about serving a personalized product so much as a tailored experience. Brands are now using suggestions as a way to relieve choice paralysis—the phenomenon in which a person feels overwhelmed by the number of options available to them—and consumers are receptive to it.

It’s the next phase of personalized marketing—and it goes a few steps further than addressing a person by name in promotional emails. According to a Salesforce study, more than 63% of Millennials are willing to share their data with companies in exchange for offers and discounts specific to them.1 By analyzing user data, brands aren’t just predicting behavior but shaping it. Fashion retailer Topshop offers an online style quiz in which users answer questions about their wardrobe and, in exchange for providing their contact and demographic information, are presented with items that fit their style. Nordstrom offers a similar digital function, called Your Look, in which the more information a user provides, the more specific the recommendations will be. The result of which is, ideally, less time spent wading through the sea of options.

It’s the same idea as the “Top Picks for You” section on streaming platforms like Netflix. With millions of hours of content to choose from, the section predicts what a user will enjoy based on past behavior. The idea is to empower the viewer to make a decision that will satisfy his or her wants by providing curated options. Netflix took it a step further recently with a new movie, Bandersnatch, that allows the viewer to decide what happens to the main character, like a choose-your-own-adventure for the digital age. Based on the viewer’s choices, the movie ultimately leads to one of five main endings. The concept offers the illusion of control, but in reality, Netflix is merely facilitating the decision-making process for viewers, the same way they do with their viewing recommendations.

An overload of choices isn’t just prevalent in the entertainment and consumer goods spheres: thanks to the advent of dating apps, options for romantic relationships can seem similarly endless. One new app, Juliet, aims to change that by providing users with one match at a time. At the end of a predetermined time span (generally less than one week), each user will respond to a series of questions about their experience interacting with their match, and the app’s artificial intelligence will select someone who is a closer match for the next day. By lessening the impact of choice on the user’s end, Juliet aims to make app-based dating feel more intentional and personal.

There is a fine line to tread in this sphere. While consumers crave assistance in finding the best options, there is still a prevalent fear that tech companies mine too much information—many a science fiction film is based on the fear of machines making decisions for humans. Brands must ensure that the personalized options they are providing do not invade the privacy of consumers. Otherwise, the positive associations from the relief of choice paralysis may begin to feel like an assault on free will.

1 https://www.salesforce.com/blog/2016/12/consumers-want-more-personalized-marketing.html

Ditching the Digital

Ditching the Digital

As cultural anthropologists, TTC studies emerging behavioral patterns and their social implications, setting aside several days annually to exclusively focus on one trend. Recently, we wrote about the growing omnipresence of the digital detox, in which people purposely separate from electronic devices. Finding vast implications for our personal and professional lives, we departed for a dude ranch in the mountains of Mexico to observe how it might impact us.

Our weekend detox demanded the conscious uncoupling of human and device, and by extension, of human and social, professional and familial circles. The toughest part of that, for some of us, was simply giving ourselves permission to do so.

“The challenge was in allowing myself to be unavailable,” said Pamela Thomas, president of The Thomas Collective. “The advantages to being present and disconnected are clear, but can become hindrances if you don’t give yourself the space to be unreachable.” The concept behind the digital detox relies on an individual’s recognition that a purposeful break is even necessary, given their increased reliance on their devices.

For most of us, a digital detox was easier said than done. Smart phones are so much more than telephones. One of the most frequently used capabilities is the camera, which has allowed the world to document their lives on social media.

“I’m a photography lover, so I did use my phone on airplane mode to take photos,” admitted Deanna Brigandi, account coordinator. “But that made me think, ‘Who am I taking these photos for?’ Do I take photos to look back on later in life, or do I take them knowing I will eventually post them to social media? I think it’s a little bit of both.”

Brigandi’s quandary was shared by all on the trip. Does the focus on documenting an experience take away from the experience itself? The compulsion to take a photo seems to be in part driven by the desire to preserve a moment, as Brigandi mentioned. But studies actually show that when people take photos, their memories of those moments will fade more than those who did not.1 So then, by refraining from taking photos, we are actually making stronger memories.

Nearly everyone in the group articulated a level of discomfort when first separating from their devices, but some eventually found that taking a step away from their social orbits wasn’t necessarily a negative.

“It was a challenge to break out of the routines associated with my device, but once I actually did it, I was surprised by how much easier it was to be out of contact with people than I expected,” said Doug Burger, senior account coordinator. Smart phones have led us to assume a default setting of interconnection, but once that option is no longer available, we’re reminded that constant contact simply isn’t necessary.

Our takeaway in the brief time we spent away? A deeper understanding of how strong our relationships had become to our devices. Self-insight is always the first step in breaking a habit, and the next is deciding to change. But we live in a world that expects immediate responses, and demands—in both work and play—availability and participation. Until we are ready to limit professional and social participation, the digital detox will just be a reminder of that.

1 https://qz.com/1295131/research-shows-taking-photos-decreases-the-ability-to-remember-lived-experience

What’s in a Word?

What's in a Word

Language is powerful.

Not only is it the medium through which we express thoughts, but it can also foreshadow cultural shifts. The words people choose and the order in which they use them reflect the cultural moment, providing insight into their desires and motivators. It would be foolish to assume that successful brands don’t have a finger to the pulse of how their audience communicates. But an equally important question to ask is: Why are they communicating that way? Why are certain words used and others avoided? The “why” of language can predict future behavior and is a valuable tool for those looking to gain a greater understanding of a segment of the population.

Considering language is akin to analyzing choice. People choose to use words that are culturally and topically appropriate, and avoid those that are not. An obvious example is profanity. Since it does not adhere to the norms of most public interactions, it is common to avoid using profanity in situations where it may be considered culturally or socially unacceptable. But language is constantly evolving, so words considered appropriate today could be taboo tomorrow.

Take “anti-aging.” Once a term used to describe an entire genre of skincare products, it is now thought to perpetuate ageist thinking. Beauty brand Neutrogena proudly aligned itself with this change by declaring, “We’re not anti-aging, we’re anti-wrinkles.” Allure magazine banned the word from its pages. In its place are descriptors like “age perfect” and “renewal.” Neither the products nor the conversation have changed—just the positioning.

Like subtle changes in language, the dialogue surrounding a brand’s category or products can shift with culture. Take Kleenex’s need to rebrand their “man-sized” tissues as “extra large” due to complaints of sexism. Weight Watchers, whose very name had become problematic, changed its name to simply “WW” to better align with the cultural shift towards body positivity. Rebranding is drastic, but changing the language consumers use to refer to a brand has the power to change how they think, feel and (optimally) act.

As always, brands should proceed with authenticity when adjusting their usage of language. Trends come and go, especially in regards to how people speak, and brands should be thoughtful in their communication, not impulsive. Slang words and phrases seemingly become ubiquitous overnight, but that doesn’t mean brands should start advertising how “lit” their products are. In fact, 69% of consumers consider brand use of slang language annoying.[1]

It’s impossible to overstate the power of language. The way people speak informs how they think and act. Brands must continue to adhere to the old adage “think before you speak.” But to ensure the most culturally intelligent communications strategy, perhaps the counsel is to listen before you act.

[1] https://sproutsocial.com/insights/data/q2-2017/

Empowering the Fempreneur

A Young Business Girl Uses Megaphone

Once upon a time, the descriptor “bossy” was akin to slander for many women, but those days are long gone. This is the era of the fempreneuer. The girl boss. The boss lady. In the last two decades, there has been a 114 percent increase in the number of women-owned businesses in the U.S. alone.[1] And it’s not just one generation: Women of all ages are forging their own paths in the business world, from Baby Boomers to Millennials. While motivations differ on a granular level, business-minded women are pursuing their own paths for two overarching reasons: necessity and autonomy.

“Necessity entrepreneurship” is the driving force for many women starting their own businesses, according to the National Women’s Business Council.[2] It’s the idea that, for any number of reasons, women are not seeing the positions they want in the labor force, so they’re creating opportunities for themselves. Factors such as income inequality, the glass ceiling and lack of flexibility in dealing with work and family care are potent enough for the fempreneuer to carve out her own career.

Another motivator? Autonomy. Women are starting businesses to achieve the lifestyle they want. More than ever, these #dontquityourdaydream-ers are turning their passions into their careers, with side hustles becoming full-fledged businesses. The digital sphere, and especially social media, have provided ample opportunity to capitalize on niche interests. Personal trainer–turned fitness magnate Kayla Itsines began her career as a personal trainer at a gym. Rather than limit her client base to members of the gym, Itsines took her workouts to Instagram. Her tips and transformation stories racked up a following of over 10 million people, creating a fitness empire that includes best-selling books, stadium tours and an app that topped the fitness charts in 2016.[3]

These female entrepreneurs live in a world where their start-ups receive half the funding of their male counterparts, while producing over twice the revenue.[4] This structure has created new ways to build a business, such as seeking funding from female-managed investment firms, like Golden Seeds, which focus on women-led businesses. Social media has also proven to be a potent tool for women that saw it not only as a way to showcase their offerings, but a platform to build their personal brand.

The increase of female-owned businesses has resulted in another realm of growth: an industry that aims to help women succeed in the entrepreneurial space. In many cases, it’s the result of a “women-helping-other-women” ethos. Those who have succeeded in their business endeavors seek to impart knowledge to women looking to launch their own brand. Create & Cultivate, founded by Jaclyn Johnson, an under-30 female entrepreneurial success story, is a series of conferences that connect like-minded women and provide workshops and networking sessions related to starting a business. Girlboss, founded by Sophia Amoruso, a woman who also found success in the entrepreneurial space at an early age, is a multifaceted platform that provides women with career and financial resources, in addition to hosting events that bring would-be fempreneurs together.

All indicators signal that this female entrepreneurial movement will not slow down. We believe that women will continue to innovate and create new opportunities for themselves. This enterprising attitude is something that brands should consider: Women are ambitious, smart and unwilling to settle. To succeed with this segment, it is crucial to demonstrate an understanding of its motivations, and support the trails women are blazing.

[1] https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/number-of-women-owned-businesses-growing-2-5-times-faster-than-national-average-1007300927
[2] https://s3.amazonaws.com/nwbc-prod.sba.fun/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/09084854/NWBC-Report_Necessity-as-a-Driver-of-Women%E2%80%99s-Entrepreneurship-Her-Stories.pdf
[3] https://www.forbes.com/sites/clareoconnor/2017/04/10/forbes-top-influencers-inside-the-rise-of-kayla-itsines-the-internets-workout-queen/#79cfe098673f
[4] https://www.forbes.com/sites/annapowers/2018/07/31/women-founded-start-ups-receive-less-funding-but-produce-double-the-revenue-a-study-finds/#66568ae964e4

Desperate for a Digital Detox

Digital Detox

The latest smartphone model used to be the pinnacle of luxury, but now, time away from that device has usurped it as the commodity people most crave.

What happened?

The technology that helped simplify lives, fortify connections and spread access to information has in some cases eliminated human connection. Smartphones carry the guise of allowing a user to multitask, but this digital convenience can lead to real-world accidents—think texting while driving.

Add to the equation that the world seems to be on fire—literally and figuratively. A constant stream of headlines regarding natural disasters, political division and socioeconomic instability is delivered straight to phones, serving as a perpetual reminder of the chaos of the surrounding world.

There’s a greater reliance than ever on technology, with one study finding that consumers spend an average of five hours a day on their phones, a tally that nears 11 weeks annually.[1] That’s why cell phone addiction—and its potential side effects—is becoming more of a concern. Research suggests that addiction to technology is associated with anxiety, sleep deprivation, and other physical and mental ailments,[2] contributing to the growing trend of digital detoxes in which an individual purposefully disconnects with their mobile devices.

With 47% of consumers admitting to limiting their use of mobile devices,[3] it’s no surprise that the travel industry offers entire vacations around the concept of going tech-free through digital detox packages. From sailing trips to detox safaris, operators aim to provide a level of immersion that keeps you present. The Renaissance Pittsburgh Hotel incentivizes the surrender of devices upon check in with vouchers for kayaking, books, cards and board games. It’s the realization of the idea that time wasted on devices could be better spent engaging in experiences—a literal exchange of one for the other.

A more affordable way to detox is simply to try spending time away from one’s phone. That’s the rationale behind National Day of Unplugging, a project that encourages a 24-hour break from mobile devices. It’s a way to be more mindful, or more aware, of what one is doing, to temper the relationship between human and device. Mindfulness is a natural partner of digital detoxes, since it requires a consumer to consciously devote thought to something done automatically, like checking a phone for notifications.

That said, it’s not necessary to ditch the device altogether to escape the digital drudge. It may seem counterintuitive to rely on a device to help disconnect from it, but there are smartphone apps that exist to help users simultaneously unplug and practice self-care. The meditation app Headspace serves as a primer on mindfulness, with guided meditations that can assist a person in becoming more conscious of digital behavior. Mute, an app that tracks the amount of time spent on a device each day, asks users to account for their phone usage, sending alerts when a certain level of usage is reached. The logic behind these apps is that awareness can contribute to a healthier relationship with devices.

Any brand can support the disconnecting trend by considering ways to enable non-digital behavior. The point isn’t to do away with technology, but to be more mindful of how it affects day-to-day life. It’s a reminder that while technology supports our lives in many ways, the reverse is not true—our lives do not exist to support technology.

[1] http://flurrymobile.tumblr.com/post/157921590345/us-consumers-time-spent-on-mobile-crosses-5
[2] https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/modern-mentality/201802/could-you-be-addicted-technology
[3] https://www2.deloitte.com/us/en/pages/technology-media-and-telecommunications/articles/global-mobile-consumer-survey-us-edition.html

Green is the New Black

Green Is the New Black

It was the announcement heard round the coffee-drinking world.

This summer, Starbucks committed to eliminating single-use straws by 2020. Over the past few years, businesses have been shifting toward waste reduction—like eliminating plastic straws and other nonessential items—which is the result of careful cultural listening. Consumers have been making lifestyle changes to reduce their environmental footprint for years, and they are demanding that the products they purchase follow suit: 91% of global consumers expect brands to address social and environmental issues.[1]

If there was ever a time for brands to start an ongoing conversation with consumers about their values, it’s now.

The food industry is uniquely situated to quickly adapt to this shift, given the consumable nature of its products. Consider Sweetgreen, the fast-casual salad chain that places sustainability at the center of its ethos. Every utensil, bowl, lid and leftover bit of salad that comes from the store is compostable. In fact, everything purchased inside of a Sweetgreen is either recyclable or compostable, so that nothing ends in a landfill. The commitment to sustainability is part of how the restaurant developed a cult-like following that has driven a 50% increase in new stores in the last two years. Continual efforts, like the recently introduced new bowl meant to cut back on food and water waste, lets customers know that sustainability isn’t just a trend, but part of Sweetgreen’s fabric.

As with any type of purpose-driven strategy, self-serving efforts are easy to spot. For years, hotels have encouraged guests to reuse linens to “save the earth” to reduce their use of water and chemicals. But the reality is clear to savvy guests: fewer washes means a lower laundering cost. That doesn’t mean the hospitality industry doesn’t sincerely value water conservation, it just means that hotels can benefit from transparency in their approach to sustainability.

Take Starwood Hotels & Resorts, which offers a “Make a Green Choice” program, in which guests are rewarded with loyalty points or a food and beverage voucher when making sustainable choices. This reflects a conversation between brand and consumer, one that benefits both and diminishes the lopsided benefit to the brand. With 79% of travelers placing an importance on properties with environmentally minded practices,[2] it is clear that conservation is not just a niche concern, but a broadly accepted demand.

For decades, the directive has been “more.” Shop more. Buy more. But what happens when a company urges customers to consume less—even if that includes its own product? Outdoor gear retailer Patagonia shocked Black Friday shoppers a few years ago when it ran an ad that urged, “Don’t Buy This Jacket.” It asked consumers to “buy less and reflect before you spend a dime on this jacket or anything else,” and included a list of initiatives Patagonia was taking to support a culture of reduced consumption. This campaign was more than just a bold move to endear the brand to the environmentally conscious—it put potential customers in the hot seat as well, asking them to consider the impact of their actions.

The differentiating point between this waste reduction trend and environmentally motivated brand tactics of the past is that it is in many ways a two-way street, requiring a conversation between brand and consumer to truly succeed. Reducing one’s environmental footprint requires adopting habits that may be at first unfamiliar and uncomfortable for both parties. It’s a new frontier that not all brands are willing to explore, but as with so many trends, early adopters are likely to be rewarded for seeing the bigger picture sooner.

[1] http://www.conecomm.com/research-blog/2015-cone-communications-ebiquity-global-csr-study
[2] https://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/28/business/hotels-embrace-sustainability-to-lure-guests-and-cut-costs.html

When D2C is Your CTA

A Young Business Girl Uses Megaphone

It’s a buyer’s world—we’re just living in it. At least that’s the takeaway from the unstoppable growth in the direct-to-consumer (D2C) sphere. Shoppers are turning to brands that sell exactly what they want—conveniently, directly and frequently online. Two-thirds of consumers expect direct connectivity with a brand,[1] paving the way for success for digital-focused brands eschewing the traditional model of selling product through a retail partner.

The conveniences inherent in online shopping have directly impacted the growth of D2C brands, not only by removing the need to shop at a brick-and-mortar location, but by eliminating the cost of selling through a middle-man. The result? Higher quality products at affordable prices. Smart luggage provider Away says it best with its tagline: “First class luggage at coach prices.” The brand’s suitcases use the same materials as luggage that costs three times as much, but by owning production, marketing, distribution and sales, Away is able to provide quality at a lower cost.

Some of the most successful D2C brands have built a business model based on expertise. Rather than produce a variety of products like retail giants of the past, successful D2C brands focus on a single category—and frequently, a single product. Consider men’s grooming company Harry’s, which launched with just one razor. After being inundated with options in the shaving aisle, founder Andy Katz-Mayfield sought to simplify the razor shopping process. Using his experience as a shopper, Katz-Mayfield created one style of high-quality razor, bypassing the need to sift through the myriad options at the store. Focusing efforts on the one razor allowed Harry’s to be viewed as a category leader despite being newer to the market than more established brands.

The D2C model also lends itself to a price transparency that customers will soon come to expect as the norm. D2C clothing manufacturer Everlane breaks down the exact cost of producing an article of clothing, from materials to labor to hardware, for every item for sale on its website. This “true cost” is displayed adjacent to the price at which Everlane sells the item, and also compared to the much higher price at which a traditional retailer lists a similar item. With nearly 40% of consumers saying they would switch to a brand that is more transparent,[2] this tactic is more than just a way to showcase the value to the customer—it allows brands to develop personal relationships with their audience.

The stories D2C brands cultivate are the natural continuation of a more transparent relationship with customers who feel increasingly comfortable discussing their affinity for brands they trust. D2C brands are harnessing the power of user-generated content, in which people share their experiences with a product, to both study and broadcast what they’ve learned about their audience. Rent the Runway, a company through which users can rent and return designer clothing, fills its Instagram with reposted images of consumers who have tagged the company in their social posts. Their feed reflects the desire of their community: real women living their best lives affordably. Rather than buying their audience through television or print ads, D2C brands are creating their audience—and proudly showing them off.

There are lessons to be learned from D2C brands even if adopting the sales model is not always feasible. Namely that specificity is key and transparency is the future. An understanding of the fundamentality of these two concepts will help brands as they seek to foster deeper relationships with consumers in a digital-focused world.

[1] https://www.iab.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/The-Direct-Brand-Economy-Master-Deck-v17.pdf
[2] https://www.cision.com/us/2017/12/transparency-key-to-brand-loyalty/

Evolution of the Experience Economy

Experience Economy

Previous generations sought status in the form of homes, cars and labels, but millennials are trading in a social currency that’s far less tangible. With 72% of millennials saying they would rather spend money on an experience than a material item,[1] the “experience economy” has seen rapid growth, opening up a world of opportunity for both brands and consumers alike.

For some brands, marketing to an experience-focused consumer is a natural fit. Airbnb, the online home rental provider, tapped into this insight with their debut television commercial, encouraging travelers to go beyond visiting a place: “Don’t go there, live there.” Expanding upon this tagline, Airbnb began offering “experiences” in addition to home rentals, through which customers can take classes, go on tours and book other cultural activities that aim to help them explore the city they’re visiting in a more authentic manner.

But a brand doesn’t have to provide tourism and hospitality services to participate in the experience economy. The act of using a product or a service is by definition an interaction, and savvy brands have harnessed that potency to foster a relationship with users. Coca-Cola® honed in on the communal aspect of consuming their product, and the resulting “Share a Coke” campaign launched a cultural zeitgeist, with soda drinkers across the country looking for a bottle bearing their friends’ (or their own) names.

Digital companies, like eyeglass retailer Warby Parker, have revolutionized the e-commerce space by adding interactive elements to the online shopping process. Consumers are sent their preferred styles to test out, which can then be easily purchased; Warby Parker will even reimburse the cost of frame adjustments at any eyeglass retailer. They’ve made the online transaction interactive without physically engaging with the consumer, creating a lasting impression that feels personal—a prime example of how brands can encourage experiences, even if they can’t directly facilitate them.

Another way that brands can make this economy work for them is by creating an interactive engagement adjacent to their product. Casper®, the direct-to-consumer, mattress-in-a-box retailer, recently launched a brick-and-mortar destination called The Dreamery, at which they literally sell the act of sleep: for $25, consumers can take a 45-minute nap on a Casper® mattress. Not just a novelty for sleepy passersby, it also serves as a creative way for potential customers to take the mattress for a test-run—something that Casper already provides to anyone who buys one of their mattresses in the form of a 100-night, risk-free trial. By turning the act of sleeping into a commodified service, Casper® has essentially created a new product category, one in which it is uniquely situated to flourish.

So, if millennial consumers have demonstrated that they will connect with brands that understand their desire for the personal and ephemeral, what experience will you create for your brand? The end-game of creating these interactions is not just to sell more product: it’s to create a lasting relationship with the consumer.

[1] http://eventbrite-s3.s3.amazonaws.com/marketing/Millennials_Research/Gen_PR_Final.pdf

Brands Can Have Existential Crises, Too

Purpose-Driven

The saying goes, “If you don’t stand for something, you’ll fall for anything,” and in the current landscape, brands are finding themselves held to the same convention. Purpose-driven marketing has saturated the marketplace in recent months, with brands as diverse as Audi and Pepsi aligning their products with a mission or a cause, to varying degrees of success.

As consumers have become more vocal about their values and activism, brands recognize the opportunity to better bond with their targets. Identifying and aligning with causes important to their audiences not only helps to dimensionalize a brand, but creates emotional connections. When Audi used its Super Bowl spend on the issue of equal pay for equal work, it demonstrated an understanding of their target’s closely-held ideals.

As always, authenticity is key. Savvy consumers see through a half-baked attempt to jump on the purpose-driven bandwagon. Consider Pepsi’s protest spot, which featured model Kendall Jenner abruptly leaving a photoshoot to join a passing protest, before uniting cops and protesters with a can of Pepsi. It carried a muddled and confusing message, and to many, trivialized social and political demonstrations. The lesson is to ensure the connection between the brand and the mission not only makes sense, but feels genuine.

With 91% of Millennials saying they would switch to a brand associated with a cause, it’s clear that space to demonstrate purpose will quickly become crowded.[1] Companies aligning with a community’s values, however, should be prepared to fully make a commitment to this new way of thinking. The more visible the alignment, the greater the expectation that they live and operate according to those values. These brands will no longer be able to stay silent on an issue related to its purpose, lest their socially-driven consumers see that silence as a position.

The companies that will win in this space will be those willing to not only demonstrate care of issues, but to stand for values that may alienate a segment or cause interruptions in growth. Audi did this by building their Super Bowl creative around the issue of gender pay gap. CVS dropped tobacco sales from their stores, Starbucks committed to hiring 10,000 refugees, and Target announced an inclusive transgender bathroom policy.

Each of the companies mentioned received varying response in their purpose stances: Target’s was most visible, with a boycott called for by a conservative organization. While Target’s same-store sales decreased during that period (which the company said was unrelated to the announcement), they received wide-spread acclaim from human rights organizations, which landed them on multiple “best places to work” lists. The reward is trading an identity with semi-universal appeal for one that connects more readily to a narrower, but higher-indexing target with greater loyalty.

We’re close to a world where consumers will make purchase choices not based on lifestyle aspirations, but on their worldview and belief system. Aligning with a brand will feel like a form of self-expression, with products serving as a physical representation of the values by which consumers define themselves. Brands will need to evaluate not only their own beliefs, but those of their target, and then decide if branching into the purpose-driven world is worth the risk. Our prediction? In the coming months, more and more brands will decide that the answer is a resounding, “Yes.”

[1] http://www.conecomm.com/news-blog/new-cone-communications-research-confirms-millennials-as-americas-most-ardent-csr-supporters